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The story is bigger than me

Feat. Derrick Rose
Progression isn’t just about honing a craft. It takes learning about yourself and the world around you. As a veteran of the league, Derrick Rose is making a point to gain that awareness, not just to improve his game on the court, but off it as well. “What’s valuable is understanding myself so that I can help other people,” he says.

Taking a breath.

For most of Derrick’s career, the motto was KIM: Keep It Moving. It was about staying focused and moving forward, whether that was getting from high school to college, college to the pros, or winning at the highest level. Even after earning the MVP, he didn’t take a moment to celebrate. Now, with over a decade in the league, he understands how perspective can improve his game. “I always had the confidence, but it’s different when you understand the totality of it,” he says.

“Everybody’s experience is different. Everybody’s life is different. Knowing yourself is an ongoing thing.”

Understand who you are.

As the world wrestles with how to address engrained injustice, Derrick believes that same perspective and introspection he applies to basketball is essential to reaching solutions. He sees people trying to help without first understanding who they really are. It’s hard to form a connection with someone who’s different than you without having an awareness of where you’re coming from. “If you don’t know about yourself, how are you going to help other people?” he asks.

“I give everyone respect. That’s just a rule, period.”

The mantra of respect started on the court, but for Derrick, it’s an approach to life itself. He describes how success can make people content or make them move through the world without learning anything. “You can move your body without moving your mind,” he says. That’s one reason he’s so optimistic about the response to social injustice—it’s growing from communities upward, perhaps more so than from the top down. “The people are doing the talking right now,” he says.

Bigger than basketball.

“That platform has given me the chance to touch others in another way that I can’t even explain,”  Derrick Rose